Everyone knows that spot cards are important - Those nines and tens can really be the difference between making a contract and going down. Here's a hand from last Tuesday where some lower spot cards were important.

N-S vul
Dealer S
S52
HKQ983
DK8753
C6
SQ10943
H5
D109
CK9432
DIR
SA86
HAJ1064
DAJ62
CJ
SKJ7
H72
DQ4
CAQ10875

WestNorthEastSouth
Kari(?)TobyPat
1C
Pass1HPass2C
PassPass2DAP

North-South were playing 4-card majors and a 12-14 NT, but their bidding was fairly standard in most systems. After the 2C bid gets passed round to him, East has a tricky decision - it doesn't seem right to pass the opponents out at the 2 level in what is likely to be a good club fit; on the other hand, you don't have great holdings in the unbid suits, your heart holding might cause opponents difficulty in their contract, and everyone is vulnerable, so if either side is going down, competing is likely to produce a bad score. Anyway, East decides to protect with 2D.

South leads the H7, and it goes 10, Q, A. Declarer now leads his CJ, and South takes the A, and switches to the D4. This goes 9, K, A. Declarer now ruffs a heart with the D10, and leads the CK. I ruff this with the D7, and declarer pitches the S6. I switch to the S5 and declarer plays low and Pat returns another spade to declarer's A. Declarer now plays the HJ to my K; I lead the H9 to declarer's 10, and Pat ruffs with the DQ. This is the position:

S
H8
D853
C
SQ10
H
D
C94
DIR
S
H6
DJ62
C
SJ
H
D
CQ108

Pat leads the CQ, I ruff with the D5, and declarer overruffs with the 6. Declarer now leads the H6 to my 8. I lead the D3, and declarer has to play the J to beat it, allowing me to win the last trick with the D8.

If I'd been watching more carefully, I could have played the D8 back on the second last trick, and ended up winning the last trick by beating the 2 of trumps with the 3. Unfortunately, I hadn't realised that this would happen.